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  • Elizabethan collars are designed to help prevent self-mutilation and as a supplementary therapy for feather-destructive birds. Collars may be designed and made by the staff at the veterinary hospital/clinic or commercially made. Collars should only be used when prescribed by an avian veterinarian. Collars are not always safe for every bird.

  • An E-collar or cone may be needed after your cat has surgery or if she has a wound. Your cat should wear the E-collar following the directions provided by your veterinarian. You may need to make a few adjustments in your home to ensure your cat does not get stuck in confined spaces. Also, you may need to adjust her feeding station to assist with her eating habits.

  • Feline eosinophilic keratitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the cornea that results in the surface of the eye appearing pink, white, or chalky. It is caused by an accumulation of inflammatory cells called eosinophils. The clinical signs, appearance, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition are explained in this handout.

  • Many liquid potpourri products and essential oils, including oil of cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, tea tree (melaleuca), wintergreen, and ylang ylang, are poisonous to cats. Both ingestion and skin exposure can be toxic.

  • Ethylene glycol, a sweet-tasting, odorless liquid, is the active ingredient in antifreeze. Ethylene glycol can also be found, in lower concentrations, in some windshield de-icing agents, hydraulic brake fluid, motor oils, solvents, paints, film processing solutions, wood stains, inks, printer cartridges, etc.

  • Ethylene glycol, a sweet-tasting, odorless liquid, is the active ingredient in antifreeze. Ethylene glycol can also be found, in lower concentrations, in some windshield de-icing agents, hydraulic brake fluid, motor oils, solvents, paints, film processing solutions, wood stains, inks, printer cartridges, etc.

  • Exercise restriction refers to the act of intentionally limiting a pet’s physical activity. Veterinarians often recommend exercise restriction to allow a pet to heal after a surgical procedure or injury, although it may also be recommended to prevent worsening of a medical condition. Different circumstances require different degrees of exercise restriction, so your veterinarian’s guidance is essential when implementing exercise restriction.

  • The sight of blood is frightening for many people, especially when an injured cat is bleeding. With quick first aid, the situation is not as scary. An injured pet is scared and in pain so be sure to take precautions to avoid being bitten. You may need to use a muzzle or have someone restrain your cat while you provide first aid. Keeping wounds covered with pressure to slow the bleeding is the first step. Minor injuries may be manageable at home, but larger wounds and internal wounds require immediate veterinary care.

  • Insect stings or bites can cause mild signs of swelling, pain, and itching or can be more severe causing hives, anaphylactic reactions, difficulty breathing, vomiting, diarrhea, or seizures. If the sting or bite has been observed, look for the insect or spider to allow identification. Look for a stinger and carefully remove it without squeezing more venom out of the venom sac. Depending on the severity of the reaction, first aid including cool packing the area, dosing with oral antihistamine, and prevention of self-trauma may be all that is needed; however, in more severe cases emergency veterinary attention is required to stabilize the dog, screen for organ dysfunction, and provide supportive care.

  • Lameness occurs due to the injury or debilitation of one or more parts of the leg; bones, muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, or skin. Depending on the cause of the limp, immediate veterinary care may be needed. If your dog is in severe pain, carefully transport your dog to your veterinary hospital or emergency hospital immediately. For non-emergency limps, you may be able to determine the cause of the limp and provide home care. If the lameness persists for more than 24 hours, seek veterinary care. Medication or surgery may be necessary to help your cat heal and reduce pain.